Vinyl Review: Moment — Thick & Unwieldy From All Our Layers

News / Reviews / July 5, 2016

An absolutely thorough compilation for a band who didn’t get their due

Tor Johnson Records

Man, if I’d heard Moment when I was 19, I’d have been a fan for life.

The manner in which Moment connects the disparate elements of East Coast punk rock from the late ‘90s and early ‘00s is amazing to say the least. It’s melodic, but rough-edged, and there’s this combination of catchy, hook-laden choruses with breakdowns which absolutely fascinate.

I’ve always been a big fan of bands you can sing along to (finger-pointing mandatory), while also being able to bounce around in the pit, doing the whole “push-moshing” thing. The earlier 7-inch and demo tracks on the second LP of this set are a little faster and a little more emotional hardcore, like “Lights! Camera! Die!” or “Aramara,” which have that whole slack-string guitar, bridging the gap between indie rock and hardcore. It’s coupled with razor-throated screams to really drive home the resonance of lyrics like “And if someone had stopped me, I would have killed myself in those days. I just grew up before I had the chance.”

Stuff to shout along to, right?

I feel like they could have easily been important to me, had the time and place been different.

This is just as thorough an examination of a band as can be hoped for. It’s everything Moment recorded. The first LP is their full-length album, Songs for the Self-Destructive, and the second compiles splits, singles, and their original demo. Being able to hear a complete document — that full-length — while then going back to explore the various bits and parts, showing how Moment grew as an act, really speaks to a devotion for this band. The most impressive part of it all is that I’d never heard of Moment prior to the announcement of Thick & Unwieldy From All Our Layers, yet thanks to this package, I feel like they could have easily been important to me, had the time and place been different. As it is, I know they were important to many, and I can’t imagine how much this means to them.

Sound Quality

Despite being a collection of songs recorded over the course of years, in a bunch of different studios, this sounds like there was a lot of work put into making sure everything sounded the best it could. You could easily take these cuts and mix them up; it would be hard to locate their historical location. The vinyl sounds great, although it’s got that weird pop-punk production where everything’s leveled strangely, making it sound a bit flat. A bit more low-end in the mastering would’ve emphasized the heavier aspect of Moment’s music, but that’s more then than now.

Packaging

Props to the “black and blue” double vinyl LP colors. Clever. The cover is a screen-printed and embossed job — foldover, rather than a full jacket, but it looks amazing. The liner notes come in another jacket, which is embossed with the same logo as the cover, but without the ink. 

Extras

There are lyrics here, as well as an essay on the band and what Moment meant, by Jamie of There Were Wires. It comes with a download code, as well as two photos of the band. It’s a complete package in every sense of the word, and you can tell the absolute love which Tor Johnson put into it.

An absolutely thorough compilation for a band who didn't get their due Tor Johnson Records Man, if I’d heard Moment when I was 19, I’d have been a fan for life. The manner in which Moment connects the disparate elements of East Coast punk rock from the late ‘90s and early ‘00s is amazing to say the least. It’s melodic, but rough-edged, and there’s this combination of catchy, hook-laden choruses with breakdowns which absolutely fascinate. I’ve always been a big fan of bands you can sing along to (finger-pointing mandatory), while also being able to bounce around in the pit, doing the whole "push-moshing" thing. The earlier 7-inch and demo tracks on the second LP of this set are a little faster and a little more emotional hardcore, like “Lights! Camera! Die!” or “Aramara,” which have that whole slack-string guitar, bridging the gap between indie rock and hardcore. It's coupled with razor-throated screams to really drive home the resonance of lyrics like “And if someone had stopped me, I would have killed myself in those days. I just grew up before I had the chance.” Stuff to shout along to, right? [perfectpullquote align="right" cite="Nick Spacek" link="http://modern-vinyl.com/author/nickspacek/" color="" class="" size=""]I feel like they could have easily been important to me, had the time and place been different.[/perfectpullquote] This is just as thorough an examination of a band as can be hoped for. It's everything Moment recorded. The first LP is their full-length album, Songs for the Self-Destructive, and the second compiles splits, singles, and their original demo. Being able to hear a complete document — that full-length — while then going back to explore the various bits and parts, showing how Moment grew as an act, really speaks to a devotion for this band. The most impressive part of it all is that I'd never heard of Moment prior to the announcement of Thick & Unwieldy From All Our Layers, yet thanks to this package, I feel like they could have easily been important to me, had the time and place been different. As it is, I know they were important to many, and I can't imagine how much this means to them. Sound Quality Despite being a collection of songs recorded over the course of years, in a bunch of different studios, this sounds like there was a lot of work put into making sure everything sounded the best it could. You could easily take these cuts and mix them up; it would be hard to locate their historical location. The vinyl sounds great, although it's got that weird pop-punk production where everything's leveled strangely, making it sound a bit flat. A bit more low-end in the mastering would've emphasized the heavier aspect of Moment's music, but that's more then than now. Packaging Props to the “black and blue” double vinyl LP colors. Clever. The cover is a screen-printed and embossed job — foldover, rather than a full jacket, but it looks amazing. The liner notes come in another jacket, which is embossed with…

Grade

Music - 72%
Sound Quality - 71%
Packaging - 85%
Extras - 76%

76%

A meaningful sound to some can now represent something to an expanded fanbase.

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76

“Thick & Unwieldy From All Our Layers: A Discography” can be purchased from Tor Johnson Records.


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Nick Spacek
Nick Spacek was once a punk, but realized you can’t be hardcore and use the word “adorable” as often as he does. Nick is a self-described “rock star journalist,” which is strange, considering he’s married with four cats and usually goes to bed by 9. This is just further proof that you can’t trust anyone online.






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