Vinyl Review: The Conquerors — Wyld Time

News / Reviews / Vinyl Review / September 30, 2016

Swinging garage that proves mining the past can be catchy

High Dive Records

Every single song The Conquerors have turned out on their debut LP, Wyld Time, is a catchy, toe-tapping, hip-shaking bit of wonderful. After a year and a half of singles, we finally get a full-length from the rock ‘n’ roll sextet and it’s worth the wait, too — on Wyld Time, the band’s turned out a 10-song romp through the garage, but also through the decades.

Peg ‘em as garage rock as much as you’d like, but they’re not beholden to any particulars. The title track could’ve easily fit in with The Strokes and their ilk, whereas “Can’t You See” is the very textbook definition of Beatle-esque (in the best possible way). “Guess I Was Wrong” is a sleepy, country-tinged weeper that’ll have you crying in your drink until the end, where it kicks up its heels and makes a twangy run for it.

Rory Cameron’s vocals are fantastic, but it’s on tracks such as “Turned Me to Stone,” where guitarist Vincent Lawhorn and bassist Quentin Schmidt kick in for harmonies, that the songs really kick it up a notch. Even when they’re just crooning wordlessly, a la “This Is It,” it’s still just a little something special.

Additional points need to be given to Adam Wagner’s work on keys and organ. It’s unobtrusive, and never really takes center stage, but much like Lawhorn and Schmidt’s backing vocals, it’s another layer which makes Wyld Time such a damned delight. There’s a lot going on here, but never does it feel manically overdone. Penultimate cut, “I’ll Get You Someday,” demonstrates this perfectly, with everything coming in one by one, until it’s perfectly arranged.

Props to The Conquerors for ending with the swinging go-go garage of “Telling You (It’s Alright),” as well — as the album swings its way to a close, you’re 100% ready to put on your dancing shoes and let this one unwind again and again.

Sound Quality

The vinyl sounds amazing, and full, and clear. The production gives it a jangle, so there’s not a lot of bass, but it’s fairly faithful to the aesthetic The Conquerors maintain. It’s clean, but not anti-septically so.

Packaging

The transparent blue is limited to 100 copies, but it’s absolutely worth getting your hands on a copy, as it’s just gorgeous. The color fits in nicely with the psychedelic flower-power imagery of the cover. Stellar use of matte finish on the LP jacket, as well. It looks like it came straight out of the ‘60s, without seeming like a mawkish attempt at sentimentality. It’s a genuine homage, and looks wonderful.

Extras

There are no liner notes, but Wyld Time comes with a download code.

Swinging garage that proves mining the past can be catchy High Dive Records Every single song The Conquerors have turned out on their debut LP, Wyld Time, is a catchy, toe-tapping, hip-shaking bit of wonderful. After a year and a half of singles, we finally get a full-length from the rock ‘n’ roll sextet and it’s worth the wait, too — on Wyld Time, the band’s turned out a 10-song romp through the garage, but also through the decades. Peg ‘em as garage rock as much as you’d like, but they’re not beholden to any particulars. The title track could’ve easily fit in with The Strokes and their ilk, whereas “Can’t You See” is the very textbook definition of Beatle-esque (in the best possible way). “Guess I Was Wrong” is a sleepy, country-tinged weeper that’ll have you crying in your drink until the end, where it kicks up its heels and makes a twangy run for it. Rory Cameron’s vocals are fantastic, but it’s on tracks such as “Turned Me to Stone,” where guitarist Vincent Lawhorn and bassist Quentin Schmidt kick in for harmonies, that the songs really kick it up a notch. Even when they’re just crooning wordlessly, a la “This Is It,” it’s still just a little something special. Additional points need to be given to Adam Wagner’s work on keys and organ. It’s unobtrusive, and never really takes center stage, but much like Lawhorn and Schmidt’s backing vocals, it’s another layer which makes Wyld Time such a damned delight. There’s a lot going on here, but never does it feel manically overdone. Penultimate cut, “I’ll Get You Someday,” demonstrates this perfectly, with everything coming in one by one, until it’s perfectly arranged. Props to The Conquerors for ending with the swinging go-go garage of “Telling You (It’s Alright),” as well — as the album swings its way to a close, you’re 100% ready to put on your dancing shoes and let this one unwind again and again. Sound Quality The vinyl sounds amazing, and full, and clear. The production gives it a jangle, so there’s not a lot of bass, but it’s fairly faithful to the aesthetic The Conquerors maintain. It’s clean, but not anti-septically so. Packaging The transparent blue is limited to 100 copies, but it’s absolutely worth getting your hands on a copy, as it’s just gorgeous. The color fits in nicely with the psychedelic flower-power imagery of the cover. Stellar use of matte finish on the LP jacket, as well. It looks like it came straight out of the ‘60s, without seeming like a mawkish attempt at sentimentality. It’s a genuine homage, and looks wonderful. Extras There are no liner notes, but Wyld Time comes with a download code. [gallery link="file" ids="80961,80960,80963"] [taq_review] "Wyld Time" is available on limited edition blue vinyl from High Dive Records. Portions of this review originally appeared in the Kansas City Pitch.

Grade

Music - 77%
Sound Quality - 73%
Packaging - 79%
Extras - 53%

71%

The Conquerors are proof positive that "Beatles-esque" can be a good thing.

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71

“Wyld Time” is available on limited edition blue vinyl from High Dive Records.

Portions of this review originally appeared in the Kansas City Pitch.


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Nick Spacek
Nick Spacek was once a punk, but realized you can’t be hardcore and use the word “adorable” as often as he does. Nick is a self-described “rock star journalist,” which is strange, considering he’s married with four cats and usually goes to bed by 9. This is just further proof that you can’t trust anyone online.






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