Vinyl Review: Eve 6 — Eve 6

Album Review / News / Reissues / Vinyl Review / January 19, 2017

Nineties alt-rockers’ debut LP offers surprises in fresh spin

RCA/Sony/Wargod

Eve 6’s self-titled debut is nearly 20 years old, and I only just listened to it all the way through. It’s weird when an album as omnipresent as this finally makes its way to vinyl, because it’s not like you can’t easily snag a copy of the compact disc in any record store dollar bin. Despite this being a platinum record, it’s the sort of thing which dominated the ‘90s alt-rock scene: an album with a big, inescapable single that led to a sophomore album which was more of the same.

Eve 6’s cut was “Inside Out,” which immediately begins playing in my head every time I mention it, but the rest of the album is mostly middle of the road, alt-rock pop that’s fairly disposable. You can hear the roots of the band’s next big single, “Here’s to the Night” (off their sophomore LP, Horrorscope) in a couple of the songs’ more melancholy moments.

However, what really surprised me was the small handful of pop-punk songs on the album. I’d never pegged Eve 6 as a band with any kind of edge, even an ever-so-slight one reminiscent of MxPx or Wax, but there’s “Open Road Song” and “How Much Longer,” perfectly epitomizing that particular strain of catchy, slightly punky music.

Eve 6 is a fairly banal record, but it’s no better nor worse than most alt-rock radio fare of the same era. While not necessarily something which inspires fervent devotion, it’s also neither the sort of record which you’ll yank off the turntable in disgust. It’s the kind of thing you listen to, accept the fact that’s how you spent about 40 minutes, and then it sits on your shelf for a couple of years.

Sound Quality

The audio sounds good, but it’s not as well-rounded as it could be. It was remastered for vinyl, but it’s still a little on the muddy side. The vinyl has some loud pops and skips, as well — but that may be more a factor of the colored wax than the pressing itself.

Packaging

The packaging looks a tad grainy, as if the original artwork wasn’t able to be found, and they had to blow it up from a scan of something else. It’s only noticeable if you look really closely, though, and most fans likely won’t care. The vinyl is absolutely gorgeous, though — clear with black smoke, and it’s a pretty robust 180-gram pressing. The liner notes include the original lyric sheet, as well as accounts from the band, looking back on the album and its place in their history.

Extras

The reminisces from band members and the clear with black smoke colorway are pretty amazing, and there’s also a red/black swirl variant, as well.

Nineties alt-rockers' debut LP offers surprises in fresh spin RCA/Sony/Wargod Eve 6’s self-titled debut is nearly 20 years old, and I only just listened to it all the way through. It’s weird when an album as omnipresent as this finally makes its way to vinyl, because it’s not like you can’t easily snag a copy of the compact disc in any record store dollar bin. Despite this being a platinum record, it’s the sort of thing which dominated the ‘90s alt-rock scene: an album with a big, inescapable single that led to a sophomore album which was more of the same. Eve 6’s cut was “Inside Out,” which immediately begins playing in my head every time I mention it, but the rest of the album is mostly middle of the road, alt-rock pop that’s fairly disposable. You can hear the roots of the band’s next big single, “Here’s to the Night” (off their sophomore LP, Horrorscope) in a couple of the songs’ more melancholy moments. However, what really surprised me was the small handful of pop-punk songs on the album. I’d never pegged Eve 6 as a band with any kind of edge, even an ever-so-slight one reminiscent of MxPx or Wax, but there’s “Open Road Song” and “How Much Longer,” perfectly epitomizing that particular strain of catchy, slightly punky music. Eve 6 is a fairly banal record, but it’s no better nor worse than most alt-rock radio fare of the same era. While not necessarily something which inspires fervent devotion, it’s also neither the sort of record which you’ll yank off the turntable in disgust. It’s the kind of thing you listen to, accept the fact that’s how you spent about 40 minutes, and then it sits on your shelf for a couple of years. Sound Quality The audio sounds good, but it’s not as well-rounded as it could be. It was remastered for vinyl, but it’s still a little on the muddy side. The vinyl has some loud pops and skips, as well — but that may be more a factor of the colored wax than the pressing itself. Packaging The packaging looks a tad grainy, as if the original artwork wasn’t able to be found, and they had to blow it up from a scan of something else. It’s only noticeable if you look really closely, though, and most fans likely won’t care. The vinyl is absolutely gorgeous, though — clear with black smoke, and it’s a pretty robust 180-gram pressing. The liner notes include the original lyric sheet, as well as accounts from the band, looking back on the album and its place in their history. Extras The reminisces from band members and the clear with black smoke colorway are pretty amazing, and there's also a red/black swirl variant, as well. [taq_review] Eve 6's self-titled LP is available from Wargod.

Grade

Music - 67%
Sound Quality - 68%
Packaging - 71%
Extras - 73%

70%

While not a necessary inclusion for everyone, Eve 6 fans would be crazy to pass up this release.

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70

Eve 6’s self-titled LP is available from Wargod.


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Nick Spacek
Nick Spacek was once a punk, but realized you can’t be hardcore and use the word “adorable” as often as he does. Nick is a self-described “rock star journalist,” which is strange, considering he’s married with four cats and usually goes to bed by 9. This is just further proof that you can’t trust anyone online.






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