Vinyl Review: Recht Herzlich — Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten

News / Reissues / Reviews / August 8, 2017

German New Wave dance music to fulfill all your ’80s dance party needs

Private Records

Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten is an album of which I’d never heard before Jay at Private Records announced it, but after five minutes poking around on YouTube, I was chomping at the bit for it to arrive in the mail. This is definitely a product of the early ‘80s — fans of the Human League, et al, will find a lot to like in Recht Herzlich’s synth work.

The repress of the 1982 album, originally released on the Reflektor Z label, features Roland 808s that pound in insistent 4/4 time, with vocals by Andreas Vichr and Vera Vanessa De La Palma. De La Palma’s vocals are the ones which remind me most of the Human League. They’re slightly flat and affected, reflecting a certain dancefloor ennui that’s actually kind of entrancing. I don’t know a word of German, so I’m having to go by delivery and inflection, but it seems a little dark?

Maybe I’m just taking too much from the duo’s most notable song, “Walpurgisnacht,” which is a German revel that’s tied in witches and ties in with Goethe’s Faust. Recht Herzlich’s track opens with Gothic overtones — the synths sound like a church organ at the beginning of something from Phantom of the Opera — and sounds like it was recorded in a basement. Actually, per Vichr’s comment on YouTube, it was “a minimalistic ‘cellar’ (not bedroom) project.” He continued: “I am the composer and I am singing as Recht Herzlich together with Vanessa that time. We were [sic] using cheap casio keyboards, Minimoog and Korg Monopol TR808 – well the usual set-up.”

All said, Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten is one hell of a fun record. You’re going to find yourself dancing like crazy, and while you’ll likely not have the slightest clue as to what the songs are about, the beats and grooves are funky enough that they translate just fine.

Sound Quality

Herzlich’s tunes are pretty amazing music when heard in any format, but Private always goes the distance to ensure their pressings are top-notch. After listening to YouTube rips of these songs for a week, dropping the needle on the Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten LP was mind-blowing. They’re not tinny, silly little songs — these are some low-end dancefloor movers.

Packaging

The LP is housed in a reproduction jacket, which replicates the original album artwork exactly. The cardboard’s a little on the thin side, but the artwork looks pretty good. Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten is pressed on translucent red 160-gram vinyl, which is almost but not quite pink. There’s also an anti-static sleeve to hold the LP, and as per usual, the whole thing goes into a Japanese-style fold-over plastic jacket.

Download Code: No.

German New Wave dance music to fulfill all your '80s dance party needs Private Records Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten is an album of which I’d never heard before Jay at Private Records announced it, but after five minutes poking around on YouTube, I was chomping at the bit for it to arrive in the mail. This is definitely a product of the early ‘80s — fans of the Human League, et al, will find a lot to like in Recht Herzlich’s synth work. The repress of the 1982 album, originally released on the Reflektor Z label, features Roland 808s that pound in insistent 4/4 time, with vocals by Andreas Vichr and Vera Vanessa De La Palma. De La Palma’s vocals are the ones which remind me most of the Human League. They’re slightly flat and affected, reflecting a certain dancefloor ennui that’s actually kind of entrancing. I don’t know a word of German, so I’m having to go by delivery and inflection, but it seems a little dark? Maybe I’m just taking too much from the duo’s most notable song, “Walpurgisnacht,” which is a German revel that’s tied in witches and ties in with Goethe’s Faust. Recht Herzlich’s track opens with Gothic overtones — the synths sound like a church organ at the beginning of something from Phantom of the Opera — and sounds like it was recorded in a basement. Actually, per Vichr’s comment on YouTube, it was “a minimalistic ‘cellar’ (not bedroom) project." He continued: "I am the composer and I am singing as Recht Herzlich together with Vanessa that time. We were [sic] using cheap casio keyboards, Minimoog and Korg Monopol TR808 – well the usual set-up.” All said, Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten is one hell of a fun record. You’re going to find yourself dancing like crazy, and while you'll likely not have the slightest clue as to what the songs are about, the beats and grooves are funky enough that they translate just fine. Sound Quality Herzlich’s tunes are pretty amazing music when heard in any format, but Private always goes the distance to ensure their pressings are top-notch. After listening to YouTube rips of these songs for a week, dropping the needle on the Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten LP was mind-blowing. They’re not tinny, silly little songs — these are some low-end dancefloor movers. Packaging The LP is housed in a reproduction jacket, which replicates the original album artwork exactly. The cardboard’s a little on the thin side, but the artwork looks pretty good. Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten is pressed on translucent red 160-gram vinyl, which is almost but not quite pink. There’s also an anti-static sleeve to hold the LP, and as per usual, the whole thing goes into a Japanese-style fold-over plastic jacket. Download Code: No. [gallery link="file" ids="91447,91446,91444"] [taq_review] "Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten" is available on vinyl from Private Records.

Grade

Music - 78%
Sound Quality - 85%
Packaging - 74%

79%

A finer piece of German New Wave disco you're not likely to stumble upon otherwise.

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79

“Hab Mut Zu Deinen Lüsten” is available on vinyl from Private Records.


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Nick Spacek
Nick Spacek was once a punk, but realized you can’t be hardcore and use the word “adorable” as often as he does. Nick is a self-described “rock star journalist,” which is strange, considering he’s married with four cats and usually goes to bed by 9. This is just further proof that you can’t trust anyone online.






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